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Accounting Scholarships

Accounting Scholarships

A degree in accounting can open up a whole world of career opportunities. Students who study accounting can do so much more than become certified public accountants. Many students who earn undergraduate or advanced degrees go on to work for the IRS or the FBI. Other students find work with private companies as claims adjusters, payroll managers, internal auditors, controllers, actuaries, and financial analysts. You can even use your expertise in the field of accounting to become a professor or a teacher.

If you want to find out more about earning a degree in accounting, it’s a good idea to interview former graduates, and speak with your career advisor. Most high school career centers provide students with research materials on different college majors. US News and World Reports published an online article called “America’s Best Graduate Schools.” According to Contabilidade Online, the top three schools for accounting are the University of Pennsylvania, University of Chicago, and University of Texas at Austin.

Scholarships for Accounting Students

Scholarships for Accounting Students

There are several scholarships for students who want to earn degrees in accounting. The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants sponsors the John L. Carey Scholarship for students seeking graduate level degrees in accounting. This is a $5,000 award, and it can be renewed for a second year if you provide proof of academic progress.

The Educational Foundation for Women in Accounting also offers several scholarships to women who want to earn undergraduate and graduate degrees in accounting. This organization is dedicated to helping to increase interest in the field of accounting among women by providing information about the field, educational resources, and financial assistance. If you’re seeking a Ph.D. in accounting, you might want to apply for the Laurels Fund scholarship. EFWA also sponsors the Women in Transition Scholarship for adults who return to school to earn an undergraduate degree in accounting. EFWA also provides information about scholarships sponsored by other organizations such as the American Society of Women Accountants.

Accounting Sales Incentives

Ultimately, your success as a sales manager or team leader comes down to more than just the tools you use to motivate your staff. Not only must you design a compensation program that gets your workers excited, you must also track your campaign in a highly visible matter. To that extent, your role is one of ringmaster or showman.

In short, you must develop a method by which to account for your sales as they come in. Some managers opt for the so-called big board on which every rep’s name is written. Next to each name is the corresponding dollar amount that he or she has produced to date. There are, however, other ways of accounting for your sales as well.

The Software Solution

The advantage of a sales software package is that it may provide you with more useful functionality than a giant chalk board. You could, for instance, recast your sales figures any number of ways and break down revenues by staff member, by time of day, by lead-generation method, or by average sale and commission. Better still, you can purchase software that accounts for your sales on an accrual basis; that is, every time a deal closes, the amounts show up instantaneously on your screen. The drawback of accounting for your sales via computer is that it doesn’t lend itself to the sort of showmanship you need–unless of course you project the data onto a screen or present it in some other compelling fashion. One way around this is to set up every individual computer terminal in your office with a copy of the software and keep a running total going on every rep’s machine. with every member of your sales force tracking the competition on his or her own computer monitor, there’s no need for a central board or screen in the first place.

Author Profile

Cory Robertson
Cory Robertson
Tom Drury was born in Iowa in 1956. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, Drury has published short fiction and essays in The New Yorker, A Public Space, Ploughshares, Granta, The Mississippi Review, The New York Times Magazine, and Tricycle: The Buddhist Review. His novels have been translated into German, Spanish, and French. “Path Lights,” a story Drury published in The New Yorker, was made into a short film starring John Hawkes and Robin Weigert and directed by Zachary Sluser. The film debuted on David Lynch Foundation Television and played in film festivals around the world. In addition to Iowa, Drury has lived in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Florida, and California. He currently lives in Brooklyn and is published by Grove Press.