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How Long Do 3D Prints Last?

How Long Do 3D Prints Last?

A common material is PLA, but there is an improved version called PLA+. This filament has up to 20% longer lifespan than PLA. In addition to PLA, filament made from nylon is better suited to high temperatures. Read on to discover which materials are best for 3D printing. Hopefully, you will have more knowledge to make an informed decision!

Polylactic acid is a biodegradable thermoplastic

Polylactic acid is a biodegradable thermoplastic

PLA stands for polylactic acid, a thermoplastic that is biodegradable. It is derived from renewable plant starch and is biodegradable, making it an excellent choice for 3D printing applications. Like ABS and nylon, PLA is also very easy to print with. However, it has less durability than other plastics. Here’s why PLA is a great choice for 3D printing, Check out the post right here.

It is hygroscopic by nature

Hydrophilic material does not necessarily have a high water absorption rate. Thermoplastics absorb moisture in different rates depending on their additives. HIPS is the most resistant to moisture absorption. HIPS is a strong, durable plastic, similar to ABS, and is rated as non-hygroscopic. This material is usually used for toys and CD cases, as well as support materials for ABS. It can dissolve in d-Limonene.

It is prone to degradation through hydrolysis

In the case of three-dimensional polymers, the degradation process is accelerated by the presence of oxygen, as observed in the hydrolytic degrading products. The initial degradation is related to the scission of the ester bonds in the polymer, resulting in the formation of low-molecular-weight oligomers. These molecules diffuse out of the matrix, causing resorption of the sample. Detection of the hydrolytic degradation products in the sample medium can be performed using traditional polymer characterization methods or electrochemical sensors.

It deforms when exposed to heat

It deforms when exposed to heat

If you’ve ever tried 3D printing, you’ve probably noticed that your parts often warp when they’re exposed to heat. This happens because plastics expand and contract with temperature. The process of 3D printing almost always involves thermoplastics. A heated enclosure or build plate can solve the problem of warping. The process can also be automated, and there are some helpful tips for doing it correctly.

Conclusion:

In 3D printing, the presence of water in the filament can cause issues like underextrusion, stringing, and bubbles. The result is a print with a poor surface finish. Humidity also weakens the structure of the filament, resulting in poor quality prints. In order to determine whether your filament is hygroscopic, you should test it for wetness by listening for cracks or popping sounds. This is a common sign of a wet filament.

Author Profile

Cory Robertson
Cory Robertson
Tom Drury was born in Iowa in 1956. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, Drury has published short fiction and essays in The New Yorker, A Public Space, Ploughshares, Granta, The Mississippi Review, The New York Times Magazine, and Tricycle: The Buddhist Review. His novels have been translated into German, Spanish, and French. “Path Lights,” a story Drury published in The New Yorker, was made into a short film starring John Hawkes and Robin Weigert and directed by Zachary Sluser. The film debuted on David Lynch Foundation Television and played in film festivals around the world. In addition to Iowa, Drury has lived in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Florida, and California. He currently lives in Brooklyn and is published by Grove Press.